Career?

Featured Career

Electronic Equipment Repairers (industry)

Electronic equipment repairers (industry) install and repair equipment used in industrial automated equipment controls, missile control systems, radar systems, medical diagnostic equipment, antenna systems, communications equipment, and transmitters. Electronic equipment repairers install electronic components of new equipment and coordinate with workers installing other components. They make sure everything is running properly by using testing equipment. When trouble occurs, electronic equipment repairers determine the problem and make repairs. Electronic equipment repairers also perform preventive maintenance.

Entry Requirements

Electronic equipment repairers (industry) gain formal training in electronics through programs lasting one to two years at vocational schools and community colleges, although some less skilled repairers may have only a high school diploma.

Average salary is $48,000 a year.

How interested are you in this career?
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

Commercial Divers

Commercial divers are the engineers, scientists, and construction workers who build and maintain our underwater infrastructure. From the oil and gas pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico to the fisheries in Alaska, divers perform an essential role that is vital to the day-to-day life of everyone. Professional divers consist of a diverse group of individuals and companies involved in a wide range of activities.

Entry Requirements

Commercial divers must have documentation showing that they completed appropriate training at a vocational school, commercial diving school, in the military, or from the Army Corps of Engineers, or from a school that has been accredited by the Association of Commercial Diving Educators (ACDE). Employers prefer to hire divers with a high school diploma. Some need an apprenticeship or a combination of several years of experience, college or other trade courses, or several years of on-the-job training.

Average salary is $40,500 a year.

How interested are you in this career?
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

Elevator Mechanics

Elevator mechanics assemble, install, and replace elevators, escalators, dumbwaiters, moving walkways, and similar equipment in new and old buildings. They maintain and repair the equipment once it is in service. Elevator mechanics are also responsible for modernizing older equipment.

Entry Requirements

Elevator mechanics apply for their jobs through the International Union of Elevator Constructors. Elevator mechanics learn their trade in a program administered by the local joint educational committees representing the employers and the union. These programs combine on-the-job training with classroom instruction in electrical and electronic theory, mathematics, applications of physics, and safety. It takes four to five years to become a qualified mechanic. Union trainees must pass a standard examination administered by the National Elevator Industry Educational Program. Most states and cities also require elevator mechanics to pass a licensing examination.

Average salary is $57,500 a year.

How interested are you in this career?
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

Construction Electricians

Construction electricians install, connect, test, and maintain electrical systems for a variety of purposes, including climate control, security, and communications in office buildings, homes, schools, stores, factories, hospitals, and other structures where electrical power is used. They may also install and maintain the electronic controls for machines in business and industry. Although most electricians specialize in either construction or maintenance, a growing number do both.

Entry Requirements

Most construction electricians learn their trade through a 4- or 5-year apprenticeship program. Some learn their skills informally, on the job, working as helpers for experienced electricians. Many helpers supplement this training with trade school or correspondence courses. Most localities require electricians to be licensed. Construction electricians generally must pass an examination that tests their knowledge of electrical theory, the National Electrical Code, and local electric and building codes.

Average salary is $49,500 a year.

How interested are you in this career?
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

Aircraft Pilots

Aircraft pilots are highly trained professionals who fly airplanes and helicopters to carry out a wide variety of tasks. Although most pilots transport passengers, cargo, and mail, others dust crops, spread seed for reforestation, test aircraft, direct firefighting efforts, track criminals, monitor traffic, rescue and evacuate injured persons, and take aerial photographs. Helicopter pilots are involved in firefighting, police work, rescue, construction, and various other operations.

Entry Requirements

All aircraft pilots who are paid to transport passengers or cargo must have a commercial pilot’s license with an instrument rating issued by the FAA. Applicants must have 250 hours of flight experience. Airline pilots must have an airline transport pilot’s license. Applicants must have 1500 hours of flying experience, including night and instrument flying, and must pass FAA written and flight examinations. Most pilots have a college degree. The armed forces is an important source of trained pilots for civilian jobs. Those without armed forces training may become pilots through flight schools. The FAA has certified about 600 civilian flying schools.

Average salary is $99,500 a year.

How interested are you in this career?
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

Associate’s degrees boost earnings and employment

According to the winter 2008–09 issue of the Occupational Outlook Quarterly, associate’s degrees are a step towards higher earnings. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, an associate’s degree holder earns an average of $128 more a week and is more likely to be employed compared with a high school graduate. Visit http://stats.bls.gov/opub/ooq/ooqhome.htm to download the article in PDF.

How helpful was this information?
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
Loading...

Blue-collar Worker Supervisors

For the millions of workers who assemble manufactured goods, service electronic equipment, work in construction, load trucks, or perform thousands of other activities, a blue-collar worker supervisor is the boss. Blue-collar worker supervisors may also be called first-line supervisors, or foremen/forewomen. In the textile industry, these supervisors may be called second hands; on ships, they may be called boatswains. In the construction industry, supervisors can be referred to as superintendents or crew chiefs.

Entry Requirements

Completion of high school is often the minimum educational requirement to become a blue-collar worker supervisor, but workers generally receive training in human resources, computer software, and management before they advance to these positions. Although many workers still rise through the ranks with high school diplomas, employers increasingly seek applicants with post-secondary technical degrees. In high-technology industries such as aerospace and electronics, employers may require a bachelor’s degree or technical school training.

Average salary is $50,500 a year.

How interested are you in this career?
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...